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Thank You Nokia

It’s so refreshing to see a manufacturer do something sensible for a change. In this case I am talking about Nokia, a manufacturer of cell phones and probably other things I am not aware of.

We recently decided to get my son a cell phone for his birthday. He’s 16 now, has a job, and is starting to drive, so we thought it would be good for him to be able to keep in touch when he is out and about, especially in the case of an emergency.

Although we had no experience with them, we decided to get him one of those pre-paid cell phone plans. More on that at a later date, but we ended up getting him a new Nokia phone that was purchased at Wal-Mart.

I’ve had a cell phone from my local provider for about the last 5 years or so. The first phone I bought with that plan was a Nokia and when I got a new phone about 3 years ago, that was also a Nokia.

When I saw how well my son’s pre-paid phone worked out, I started to think about getting in on that myself. But, having bought an accessory or two for my phone, I figured that they would become useless with the new phone.

After all, who would expect to be able to use an accessory purchased 3 years ago with a brand-new phone? Not that it’s a bad idea, just something I would not expect. In this age of throw-away consumerism, who would expect an ancient (3 years or so) accessory to work with the latest whiz-bang model, hot off the assembly line?

To my surprise, the accessories from my 3-year old phone worked just fine with my son’s new phone. Not only that, they were still compatible with my original Nokia phone which is about 5 years old now. Imagine that!

I don’t have any experience with other brands of cell phones, but if they have managed to maintain compatibility for accessories for that long in a line of phones, kudos to them as well.

My compliments to Nokia for thinking about the needs of the consumer more than I have come to expect these days, and not submitting to the temptation to completely re-design their product every year (can you hear me automobile manufacturers?) for the sake of the gee-whiz factor.

The end result is money saved for the manufacturer and consumer as well. After all, if something isn’t broke, why fix (or re-design) it?

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